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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)
correspondent pierre thomas. what are you learned, pier? >> diane, all night my sources have been calling this most the dangerous of situations. with that cabin up in flames those images prove they were right. my sources an tis palted this would end in bloody fashion. you can take dorner at his word. he said, quote, self preservation is no longer important to me. i do not fear death. as i died long ago. the situation is still dangerous. they've got to figure out a way to make certainer that dorner snot able to escape in that cloud of smoke. they're taking no chances. they describe dorner as lethal. someone well versed in the use of handguns and assault rifles. he even said he had a 50 caliber rifle. did he die in those flames? they're likely to use some sort of bulldozer to probe the building. they clearly decided to let mr. dorner die if he was inside. >> all right. standing by, watching this story. we of course will be staying with it to bring you every new development throughout this broadcast. but we do want to move on to the state of union. the president's focus will include jobs and
cecilia? >> reporter: diane, good evening. i am standing at the one-time police command post, the heart of that manhunt for christopher dorner. and just take a look at this. right over my shoulder, those houses right there, we now know that's where dorner was holed up just as of yesterday. neighbors telling us he very well may have been hiding in plain sight. from a barrage of gun fire to a rush of flame -- to that shell of a house now nothing left but rubble. >> shut down the freeway, possibly for the subject we've been looking for. >> reporter: christopher dorner's run from the law began to unravel here. to a cabin near a ski resort. police say dorner broke in and yesterday, when two unsuspecting women came by to clean, he allegedly tied them up, took their car and then sped off. one of the women broke free and managed to call the police. dorner was once again on the run. chased by police, he abandoned the stolen car, then up the road, police say dorner carjacked rick heltebrake. >> dorner jumped out of the snow at me, gun drawn, big, long rifle. so, i just stopped and put
, diane. tonight, police officers across this whole region feel they are under attack. police headquarters here on lockdown. every entrance, every exit, heavily guarded. the entire police force in america's second largest city, essentially held hostage to one man who is allegedly bent on revenge. tonight, by air, land and sea, an all-out manhunt. the suspect, one of their own. 33-year-old christopher dorner. a former lapd officer, now an alleged cop killer. police say he isn't just targeting cops, but their families, too. >> this has gone far enough. you know, nobody else needs to die. >> reporter: the killing spree started sunday in orange county, with the baffling double murder of a popular college basketball coach and her fiance. monica quan and keith laurence, shot in cold blood as they sat in their car. only last night did authorities put two and two together. quan is the daughter of retired lapd captain randy quan, who was instrumental in getting christopher dorner fired. in a rambling manifesto posted online, dorner blames quan and other lapd officers of a smear campaign, after dorn
is standing in the middle of what would be rush hour in topeka, right ginger? >> reporter: diane, here in kansas, where they have declared a state of emergency, and, yes, this is downtown topeka, main roads, nobody on them. peoples of snow, still very slick. kansas officials and others from here to nebraska, illinois and missouri, asking people to stay off the roads tonight. halted in the heartland. the monster snowstorm made for white-knuckle driving. from cars being pushes and pulled in kansas city, to this car up in flames after revving the engine trying to get up a hill in kansas. inside the behemoth storm, it looked like this. visibility, probably about a quarter mile. and sounded like that -- there we go. thundersnow. highways were shut down from missouri to kansas. >> just lost control. due to the weather condition. >> reporter: scary? >> scary! yes, it is. >> reporter: ice was an issue in parts of arkansas and missouri, where freezing rain made travel dangerous. at the storm's peak, snow fell at an amazing rate, up to three inches per hour. look how quickly it adds up in arkans
it was not unnecessary at all. >> not possible. >> see you at half time. let's welcome our guests. i am here with diane macedo who anchors business news in the morning on the fox network. and paul mccurio that makes for a great valentine's day present. it is called image makeover. and women continue want to be with him and men don't want to be him. it is bill schulz. and next to me is mike baker, the former cia operative and president of diligence. diligence, when a drone is an up close and personal, think diligence. diligence, making the world a better place for the people who pay us. >> well, it was as talky as it was clapy. that's what they said about the state of the union. it got off to a weird start. >> mr. speaker, the president of the united states. >> and then president obama spoke for what seemed like 59 minutes and 51 seconds laying out his agenda including raising the minimum wage and increasing infrastructure and attacking climate change and pushing for an "entourage" sequel. let it go. but then it seemed like he was throwing out ideas on the fly. >> we must do more to combat climate chang
tonight." >> josh brolin and diane lane have officially split up after nearly a decade. their ups, their downs, inclu including the recent drunken arrest of josh. did that play a part in the end of their marriage? you can stop googling, "e.t." knows the real story. our sources confirm that the couple separated several months ago. still on december 11th, they supported his step mom, barbra streisand at the premiere of "the guilt trip." the split happened well before josh's new year's arrest for public intoxication. we followed up with the stars. january 5th e.t. interviewed diane at the palm springs film festival with richard gere. >> he's my hero. >> we're old friends. >> is it okay with josh? >> he's with my wife tonight, so everything's fine. >> we have an arrangement, it's all good. >> the same day, brooke anderson quizzes josh. >> how do you have a successful relationship in hollywood? >> because we're not really in the spotlight. we are in times like this, just do what you do. don't play into the hype so much. >> and here's what you won't read on the blog. e.t.'s sources tell
70 miles per hour in connecticut, taking down power lines and trees. diane, i wanted to go back to that image inside the detroit whiteout today. now, if this happens, the recommendation is to gradually slow down, turn on your flashers and if you can get off the highway, do so. diane? >> again, you have to act fast. thank you so much, ginger zee reporting in tonight. >>> and now, in washington today, one man entered the arena. chuck hagel, the purple heart recipient from the vietnam war, the former senator, nominated to be secretary of defense. his former colleagues met him with a fuselage of critical questions today, and abc's chief washington correspondent jonathan karl tells us about the fiery day. >> reporter: he's a vietnam veteran and former republican senator, but today chick hagel found himself and his judgment under attack by a fellow republican and vietnam vet. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be -- >> the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since -- >> since vietnam. were you correct or incorrect? >> well, i'm not go
and risks. that rare opportunity will occur tomorrow, when john brennan speaks. diane? >> it is going to be a very combustive day. thank you, martha raddatz. >>> and also today, a more trusted part of american life has succumbed to modern times. the postal service announced today that saturday delivery of letters will soon end in august. only packages will come to your door. and abc's ron claiborne tells us about the surprising ways this will affect everyone. >> reporter: a $15 billion budget deficit has done what neither rain nor sleet nor snow could do. >> the choice is either change some of the service or raise prices. and people don't want prices raised. we'll make the changes in service. >> hello. >> how are you today? >> i'm great, thanks. >> reporter: lorenzo hudson has been making the rounds in great neck, new york, for more than 20 years. he was featured in a postal service tv commercial that ran during the super bowl pregame show. >> we don't want to see the business go under, because they couldn't get rid of saturday or because they didn't get rid of saturday, but at the sa
will win." diane? >> all right, terry moran, our thanks to you. and terry will be sending out more reports to us from inside syria in the days ahead. >>> back here at home, it's time to fasten our seat belts. for 32 straight days now, gasoline prices have soared, now a four-month high. $3.73 a gallon. and we learned today how much higher they'll rise in april and when they should start falling again. the newest member of our abc team, a veteran business reporter, linzie janis, here to explain. linzie, welcome. >> reporter: thank you very much, diane. you know, americans spent 4% of their household budget on gas last year. it's the biggest spike in three decades and it makes the recent spike all the more worrying. the pearsons know what they're not looking for in the family car. >> i don't want an suv, it's too much price -- it's too pricey on gas. >> reporter: they're giving up more space for more miles to the gallon. it's their number one priority. >> close to $4 already, i think by the end of the month, it will be $4. >> reporter: prices often spike in the spring as refineries switch ove
hackers from that secret army building in shanghai, diane. >> all right, brian ross, thank you. >>> and now, to the deepening mystery in the murder case against olympic hero oscar today, we saw dueling images. the once beloved athlete in court, hearing the charges against him. solemn, sober. while 700 miles away, there was a memorial for his girlfriend. tonight, two contradictory versions of what happened, and abc's bazi kanani takes us through both. >> reporter: in reeva steenkamp's hometown, her family gathered to say good-bye. >> there's only one thing missing, it's reeva. >> reporter: today, pistorius explained for the first time his version of events on that valentine's day. they were both sleeping, pistorius said, when he woke up and went onto the balcony when he heard a noise in the bathroom. in the pitch dark, he grabbed his gun and rushed into the bathroom, noticed an open window and thought an intruder was hiding in the toilet room. "i knew i had to protect reeva and myself," he wrote. he says he yelled for her to call police. and while still without prosthetics, he f
that people see and it would likely save your life. diane? >> and those blizzards come on so fast. thank you, ginger zee. >>> and now, we move onto the new and strange twist tonight in the case against olympic hero oscar pistorius, charged with murder. tonight, the case is turning upside down and abc's bazi kanani has the latest. >> reporter: tonight, a radical reversal. the eyes of judgment turned from olympian oscar pistorius to one of the people accusing him -- chief investigator hilton botha. botha had been the prosecution's key witness, his testimony the most likely to keep pistorius in jail. but today, embarrassed prosecutors said they didn't know the detective was being investigated for seven counts of attempted murder, opening fire on a passenger mini-bus in 2011. >> surely they should have been prepared. >> reporter: legal analysts say the bail hearing has suddenly turned in favor of the blade runner, the champion who made millions for his inspiring accomplishments. >> i never really encountered anything that i can't do. >> reporter: but since the valentine's day shooting, he has no
right now. cecilia? >> reporter: diane, good evening. the situation is still ongoing. this is what we know. christopher dorner is holed up on a house on that mountain. two officers have been shot and wounded. los angeles police just went on live television to broadcast a plea to him. telling him, enough is enough, it's time to turn yourself in. >> if he's watching this, a message for himself is, enough is enough. it's time to turn yourself in, it's time to stop the bloodshed. it's time to let this event and let this incident be over. >> reporter: in the remote mountains above los angeles today, a violent shootout. gun fire as officers in s.w.a.t. gear closed in on the man accused of killing one of their own and tormenting an entire community for the past six days. the whole exchange broadcast on live television. authorities say the suspect, holed up inside the hillside cabin, is christopher dorner, a former los angeles police officer skilled in sniper tactics. >> during that exchange of gun fire, two officers were injured. they've been air lifted to a local hospital. right now, their
between robin and diane sawyer about what she finds most liberating so far. >>> but let's get right to some breaking news, olympic sprinter oscar pistorius just granted bail in south africa, an audible question from supporters in court. the judge spoke for over two hours before ruling. abc's bazi kanani is tracking the latest. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, amy. oscar pistorius just broke down in tears when the judge announced just moments ago that he has been granted bail, that he will be allowed to go home. his family shouted for joy. they were huddled together. the magistrate said that this is not a matter of whether he's guilty but whether he has the right to have bail until he stands trial. the magistrate said that there were a couple of main factors that he considered in his decision. and those are whether pistorius is a flight risk and whether pistorius is a danger to anyone else in the community if he's allowed to go free. the midge straight said that the profession cushion wasn't able to prove that. at this moment, oscar pistorius is in the courtroom, he's listeni
grew up hearing my parents talk about. and it may be our turn now. >> reporter: diane, the worst of it is just getting under way, it will go through the early morning hours. we've had a 50-plus miles per hour gust. i have the goggles and i'm going to need it here. as will everyone else. into the overnight. diane? >> snappy goggles, but you do need that protection. thanks so much, ginger. so you're ordered off the roads in boston. but gio benitez is out on other roads for us tonight in hartford, connecticut. >> reporter: we're making the drive through hartford, connecticut. the governor here has already declared a state of emergency. he's also ordering people off the roads. as conditions deteriorate into a blizzard. >> please stay off of 95, 84, 91, merit parkway and any other limit access road in the state. only emergency personnel and response personnel should be using that road system. >> reporter: national weather service has warned of whiteout conditions throughout the storm zone. that means visibility will be near zero. 800 state and private plow crews are ready to take on t
happened. jeffrey? >> reporter: good evening, diane. it's as if an earthquake has hit the vatican. the lights are still on, the buildings are still standing, but people here rocked by the surprise resignation of benedict xvi. it began as a routine vatican ceremony, but the pope's announcement in latin was anything but routine. "i have come to the certainty that my strengths, due to an advanced age, are no longer suited to an adequate exercise of the papal ministry." with that, for the first time in 600 years, a pope is resigning. benedict xvi was already old, 78, when he became pope. that was 2005. here he is almost eight years later, clearly frail and feeble. his older brother, father georg ratzinger, said today benedict is having trouble walking and had been advised by his doctors to stop traveling overseas. benedict will relinquish his papacy on february 28th. >> today's decision by benedict xvi came as a huge surprise to me, and, i think, to everyone in rome and everyone in the vatican. >> reporter: as a cardinal, joseph ratzinger was known as john paul ii's enforcer of religi
problem, and diane, it may not be the biggest problem. take a look at this storm system, when it finally gets together. what you're seeing on the ray door tonight is not even the real storm. the storm really kicks in tomorrow, getting all its energy. it has a layer of measurable ice and that's basically, already ice storm warnings out for northern arkansas and southern missouri. that's miserable ice, we think. and this line of severe storms from new orleans, including texas, all the way to mississippi. those storms could have tornadoes in them. we could be reporting on all of it during the day tomorrow. just something everyone should look for. >> not a little bit of everything, it's a lot of everything heading their way. >> reporter: a lot. >> thank you so much, sam. good to see you tonight. >>> and now, we head off to south africa and the big twist today in the case against olympian oscar pistorius. at his bail hearing, the prosecution was under pressure, backing away from a claim about steroids near his bed. abc's bazi kanani, back on the story for us. >> reporter: stoic, oscar pistori
robin and diane sawyer, about what robin finds most liberating right now. >> we're looking forward to that. >>> but we are also standing by for breaking news in the bail hearing of olympic sprinter oscar pistorius. we'll have that any moment. we're listening to what's happening inside the courtroom. we'll bring that to you as soon as we have it. >>> but let's get started with the blast of snow and cold that is making a mess of the morning commute for much of the country right now. sam is tracking it all for us right now. >> good morning, amy. good morning, everyone. it's not just the snow and ice and cold you're talking about. when you add in the storm, it's more than 1,100 miles worth of storm, from the great lakes to the gulf coast. we'll start this morning with one of the tornadoes in mississippi and louisiana. we had them popping there. you can see it in the light area, across the field, the twitter pictures. the idea that four tornadoes possibly in that zone. we know that three have been reported. now, we're looking at storm damage that is eerily similar to a tornado in that e
: good evening, terry, diane. we're coming to you from copley square tonight. the park here took on two feet of snow just about. still, it's been a meeting place throughout the day for those brave enough to get out and take on the elements after what was a brutal storm. finally across the northeast, early signs that concern may be starting to melt away, after a long, difficult deep freeze. >> me and my husband just walked a couple of blocks from our house. we live for this stuff. >> reporter: today as the storm passed, new englanders got their first look at what it left behind. >> it's just a lot of drifts. yeah, it's a lot of snow. >> reporter: in many areas, record accumulations. but now the seemingly endless snowfall. and rushing winds of a violent blizzard have been replaced by the roar of plows and the constant hum of a comeback. >> as the winds subside and as roads get cleared, restoration work will begin in earnest. >> reporter: for many the first step comes on snow shoes or cross country skis. others bundled up for a walk in the park. anything that gives them a sense their commu
days in prayer and study. in his words, diane, he will be hidden to the world. >> all right, george, our thanks to you. and, of course, when the pope leaves, it will be up to the cardinals and their vote. and here's one snapshot from a modern pilgrimage. there he was, boston's cardinal o'malley, on the plane to rome, with a newspaper, wearing his signature simple brown robe. and we were all rewinding this tape today. seven years ago, take a look. there, sealed with a ribbon, a key turns and a new pope, pope benedict, is shown around his new home. the papal apartment. there are ten rooms, floors of 16th century marble. a library crowned with an antique ceiling. and soon, another man will be passing through that door, a pope chosen in the mysterious ritual known as the conclave. abc's david wright tells us about the ancient vote to come. >> reporter: before the cardinals file into the sistine chapel and lock the doors behind them, technicians will have pulled up the floorboards to install cell phone jamming devices. violating the secrecy is punishable by excommunication. >> it's a way
of programs and people you'll meet tonight. people like diane ladaker. she's the keeper of the bricks. ten years ago, she turned her home into a safe haven for kids. she called it kids off the block. we'll tell you about her remarkable story, but dien said she still doesn't have the happy ending these kids need because too often there is that next brick. there was tyrone lawson shot dead after a high school basketball game. instead of looking forward to the prom, his mother said i'm looking for an insurance policy to bury him. or hadiya pendleton who performed at president obama's inauguration festivities, became a gang fatality. she was not party to that fight or that culture. she was part of an epidemic. anderson and "360" have been reporting on it year after year, and people say enough is enough. >> this was the hardest thing to see another baby lying in a casket. >> get in here and change the city. make it safe for us to walk down the street every day. >> we lost seven children this year. enough is enough. >> i really, really hope somebody can stop this. >> you can expect this to happe
of a seven year old political grudge. >> joining me now is diane black. representative, great to see you. >> it's great to be with you. thank you for having me today. >> you bet. >> the president is about to honor six women who died at sandy hook and talking about gun legislation, the president said in the state of the union they deserve a vote. what do you think to the representatives who have made the same call? >> i want to say i cannot imagine being in the situation of the terrible losses that happened there at sandy hook and my heart goes out to all of the family members and that entire community. first of all, the president has not put a plan on the table and neither has the senate. but there are all kinds of solutions that the president is talking about. we have to talk about mental health. we have to talk about the people who use guns in crimes are really penalized to the highest standard that we can penalize them. the unprecedented amount of violence that the young people are seeing, these are issues that we need to talk about to make sure that when we do what we do we're truly
over ten years in additional spending cuts. diane swonk is chief economist at mesereau financial. alice rev lin was a member of the president's debt commission and is a senior fellow at the brookings institution. michael tanner is a senior fellow at the cato institute. thanks for being here. michael, you say we should not fear door number one. that is the forced budget cuts, what some people know as the skweser, as it stands, which goes into place on friday if we don't do anything. why? >> well, let's remember that first of all these are cults only in the washington sense that any reduction from future planned increases in spending is a cut. the reality is even if the sequester goes into effect, the federal government will spend more every year. by 2022 it will spend $2 trillion more than it is spending today. we're talking about cuts that are 2.4% of total federal spending. if the federal government can't cut three cents out of every dollar without throwing us into the dark ages, then clearly we're doing something wrong. >> all right, alice rivlin. simpson/bowles, i mentioned that, the
three people prior to this, another deputy died today. >> world news with diane saw jer up next. see you for the staift of the from washington, d.c. and tonight, we begin with breaking news. a shootout in the mountains of california, as police appear to close in on the former cop accused of a murderous rampage. >>> making his case. what the president will say tonight about jobs and gun violence in america. >> we'll find out tonight. >>> what's next? we show you where pope benedict will live after he resigns. and will one of these men make history as the new pope? >>> good evening from washington, d.c. we are here to cover the president's state of the union address tonight. but we begin with the breaking news at this hour, out of california. police closing in on the former cop accused of the murder rampage. christopher dorner exchanging fire with s.w.a.t. teams. officers wounded, images streaming in of police officers, guns drawn, searching cars. and abc's cecilia vega is there to tell us what is happening right now. cecilia? >> reporter: diane, good evening. the situation is still ongoin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)

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